A short, one-word name (ex. cat.com), and especially .com domains, will be pricy because simple titles have a lot of potential uses, meaning people probably already check them out on their own. If you are going after a registered .com domain, you will have to contact the current owner, and even then, prices could be high for misspellings and multiple word domains. In the past years, companies and individuals have settled for bizarre names, misspellings, and old tricks like adding “the” or “my” to the front; note, however, that this will also reduce domain performance.
When looking up a bare name in DNS, the network stack will add the search domains to it to form fully qualified domain names, and look up those as well.[8] For example, if the domain search list contains "wikipedia.org", typing "en" in the browser will direct the user to "en.wikipedia.org". Some ISPs add their own search domains via DHCP settings, similar to how they add DNS servers and other networking information; if this is undesired, the user can change this setting to ".local".
Instant Domain Search shows domain name search results as you type. Our domain checker automatically generates available domain names, shows aftermarket domains for sale, and shows domain availability for popular domain extensions—instantly! Great domain names are short, memorable, and easy to spell. Try not to use hyphens or numbers. A good place to start is what someone might type into a search engine to find your website. The domain name search results are sponsored. We earn money when you buy names and services from our partners like Go Daddy, Shopify, Wix, WordPress, and Domain.com.
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