You can easily create folders and sub-galleries to organize your photos, either on your desktop or your smartphone. To share a photo, you just have to right-click on it, copy the link, and paste it wherever you want to share it. You can also import your contacts and directly email them the link to your photo or entire gallery. If you allow them to, visitors can even download your photos or albums.


The right to use a domain name is delegated by domain name registrars, which are accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the organization charged with overseeing the name and number systems of the Internet. In addition to ICANN, each top-level domain (TLD) is maintained and serviced technically by an administrative organization operating a registry. A registry is responsible for maintaining the database of names registered within the TLD it administers. The registry receives registration information from each domain name registrar authorized to assign names in the corresponding TLD and publishes the information using a special service, the WHOIS protocol.
ImageShack has a great interface that showcases its best photos in a layout similar to Pinterest’s. You have to create an account to upload photos, but the free account offers many helpful features. You can organize your photos into albums, and you can add tags to keep track of your images and let other users discover your work. If you don’t want the ImageShack community to view your photos, you can keep your images private or only share them with a selected audience.
In the early 21st century, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) pursued the seizure of domain names, based on the legal theory that domain names constitute property used to engage in criminal activity, and thus are subject to forfeiture. For example, in the seizure of the domain name of a gambling website, the DOJ referenced 18 U.S.C. § 981 and 18 U.S.C. § 1955(d).[29][1] In 2013 the US government seized Liberty Reserve, citing 18 U.S.C. § 982(a)(1).[30]
A domain name is an identification string that defines a realm of administrative autonomy, authority or control within the Internet. Domain names are used in various networking contexts and for application-specific naming and addressing purposes. In general, a domain name identifies a network domain, or it represents an Internet Protocol (IP) resource, such as a personal computer used to access the Internet, a server computer hosting a web site, or the web site itself or any other service communicated via the Internet. In 2017, 330.6 million domain names had been registered.[1]
Google Photos is one of the best image hosting services for uploading high-quality photos in large quantities. The site has an automatic backup feature, so you don’t have to worry about losing any of your photos. Google Photos allows you to edit and organize your photos, and you can easily find older photos again with a visual search. As you use the platform more and more, it will recognize your photo habits and learn to automatically sort your photos, reducing the amount of work you need to do to keep your photos organized.
Domain names are often simply referred to as domains and domain name registrants are frequently referred to as domain owners, although domain name registration with a registrar does not confer any legal ownership of the domain name, only an exclusive right of use for a particular duration of time. The use of domain names in commerce may subject them to trademark law. 
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